More on the Police Action in Korea

Louie in Korea, c. 1952

Louie in Korea, c. 1952

Louie continues the theme of confounding letters, mixing the fun and excitement with the fear and dread. His description of jets flying overhead brings to mind the times WW II bombers have flown over Rochester on demonstration flights. Even the noise from one of those bombers raises the specter of a hundred of them ready to rain tons of explosives on us unsuspecting civilians.

After talking about the sight of a napalm strike, Louie describes two friendly fire incidents. Sobering thing, war.

Louie writes:

During the “Police Action” in 1952 I was with a group of fellas that enjoyed watching the Navy and the Air Force conduct strikes on the North Koreans.

The Air Force had this straight winged Jet that sure made a lot of noise going away from you, letting you know that it had been there to see you.

One of the sights that were unforgettable was the Napalm strikes that were, in a gruesome word, beautiful. They would fly in low and drop the napalm bombs and let go just before the target.

Louie continues … Continue reading

Police Action in Korea

Louie (r) and friend in Korea

Louie (r) and friend in Korea

For twenty-some years, and even beyond, one of my favorite television shows was M*A*S*H. I still enjoy watching reruns. Some episodes moved me to tears, others have me giggling still. My favorite line is Col. Potter saying “Not enough O’s in ‘smooth’ to describe this” as he describes some Scotch whisky in episode Z-419. The series takes place in the Police Action in Korea that Louie describes in this letter.

One truth of war and the television series is the mixture of pathos and humor. Louie’s story reads like a M*A*S*H script. I laughed at the conclusion, until I realized what had really happened.

Louie writes:

Back in 1952 I had the honor of being with, or should I say, a member of the United Nations who were engaged in a “Police Action” against the Communist of North Korea. Continue reading

I Volunteered for the Infantry!

This was the army job Louie really wanted.

This was the army job Louie really wanted.

Louie was proud of his military service, he was in the Army for several stints, including two in Korea, one in Europe, and a couple more state side.

Louie writes:

I remember the day my big brother Bob came home from the war in late 1944. We met him at the train depot in Jamestown. He hugged everyone he seen except me. I finally walked up to him and asked him if he remembered me. He said that he didn’t seem to know me. When he left I was a 97 lb. weakling and on this day I stood about two inches taller than him and outweighed him about 40 pounds. Kind of surprised him who I was. While in the South Pacific fighting the Japs …  Continue reading